encryption

Lack of security made simple: Casual Insecurity

I am travelling quite a lot because of my job, working with Avira’s customers to integrate their OEM Technologies. For this reason, I am very often in hotels and airports. Almost everywhere these days, I can find free WiFis: wireless networks with free of charge access. We all know that accessing resources through free WiFis is not the best ideas. Especially, if these networks do not have any kind of password set.   This is how I think that the Lack of Security is made so simple: offer something everybody needs for free and make that as unsecure as possible….


About ransomware, Google malvertising and Fraud

I am sick and tired to see so many people affected by this wave of ransomware attacks. I don’t want to go into details about Ransomware like Locky because it has been written quite a lot about it. The most common way that Locky arrives is as follows: You receive an email containing an attached document. The document advises you to enable macros “if the data encoding is incorrect.” If you enable macros, you don’t actually correct the text encoding (that’s a subterfuge); instead, you run code inside the document that saves a file to disk and runs it. The…


Quoted in Tech News World: Paris Attacks Deepen Encryption Debate

Paris Attacks Deepen Encryption Debate By Richard Adhikari Nov 18, 2015 5:00 AM PT   ISIS has threatened to attack the United States and continue its reign of terror elsewhere in the world, so an argument could be made that the high-tech industry would serve the greater good by agreeing to weaken encryption. “No, it should not,” maintained security expert Sorin Mustaca. “There has to always be somebody who controls those that control everyone else. The day when security companies give in to those demands is the day there’s no privacy for everyone,” he told TechNewsWorld.   Additional comments not…


Quoted in the (ISC)2 Europe newsletter: ENCRYPTION IS NOT SOLVING ALL CYBERSECURITY PROBLEMS

ENCRYPTION IS NOT SOLVING ALL CYBERSECURITY PROBLEMS     Sorin Mustaca, CSSLP, shares his thoughts from a recent Frankfurt-based automotive show on the overreliance of the car industry on Encryption, noting “…all those lights are sensors and processors which communicate with each other via the CAN BUS (Controller Area Network). If one of them is compromised, it will send invalid data to the others and the consequences are unpredictable. The data will leave the car encrypted and will be decrypted on destination, but the information is compromised.”      


No Picture

Security checklist for “Back to school”

The summer closes to end soon and we know that the next thing to happen is: children go back to school. Parents are always concerned (for good reasons) for what and how their children will do, and since a couple of years they have other concerns. Their children have smartphones, multiple online identities – parents are worrying about the security of these physical and digital assets. Thinking of this, I created this checklist which parents and children (and not only) can easily go through and  easily improve their security. Mobile devices –          Password/PIN protect your laptop, smartphone, tablet For laptops,…


No Picture

Truecrypt shutdown – 5 questions that must be asked

If you visit www.truecrypt.org you see this text below. If you install the software, you see it quite a couple of times. The domain www.truecrypt.org  is only redirecting now to www.truecrypt.sourceforge.net. There are many articles written on this topic, especially on “WHY?”. WARNING: Using TrueCrypt is not secure as it may contain unfixed security issues This page exists only to help migrate existing data encrypted by TrueCrypt. The development of TrueCrypt was ended in 5/2014 after Microsoft terminated support of Windows XP. Windows 8/7/Vista and later offer integrated support for encrypted disks and virtual disk images. Such integrated support is also available on…


No Picture

Duplicati: How to create your own secure online backup for free

One thing that almost all online backup solutions (e.g.. Dropbox, CX, Memopal, etc.) have in common is that they don’t allow the user to store encrypted files on their storage. They encrypt the connection from user’s computer to the cloud service, but once the files are there, they will be stored either unencrypted or encrypted with a key that the service provider has. This practice allows the provider to index the files and check their checksum. Once a file has a known checksum (usually SHA1) it will no longer be uploaded to the storage, it will be only referenced, in…


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