signing

Sign files unattended in batch mode while having an eToken (no password popup!) (updated)

Expanding on answers already in this thread, it is possible to provide the token password using the standard signtool program from microsoft. 1. Export your public certificate to a file from the SafeNet Client  2. Find your private key container name   3. Find your reader name  4. Format it all together The eToken CSP has hidden (or at least not widely advertised) functionality to parse the token password out of the container name. The format is one of the following []=name [reader]=name [{{password}}]=name [reader{{password}}]=name Where: reader is the “Reader name” from the SafeNet Client UI password is your token password name is the “Container name” from the SafeNet Client UI Presumably you must specify the reader name if you have more than one reader connected – as I only have one reader I cannot confirm this. 5. Pass the information to signtool /f certfile.cer /csp “eToken Base Cryptographic Provider” /k “<value from step 4>” any other signtool flags you require Example signtool command as follows signtool sign /f mycert.cer /csp “eToken Base Cryptographic Provider” /k “[{{TokenPasswordHere}}]=KeyContainerNameHere” myfile.exeUpdate:This doesn’t work after updating the key.Check this thread for more details: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/17927895/automate-extended-validation-ev-code-signing


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Why should you sign your binaries

One of the larger questions facing the software industry is: How can I trust code that is published on the Internet? Code signing is the process of digitally signing executables and scripts to confirm the software author and guarantee that the code has not been altered or corrupted since it was signed by use of a cryptographic hash.[Wikipedia] This means that code signing can provide several valuable features: – provide identity of the software when deploying – as can be seen in the picture below, it is reassuring to know that the binary comes from the producer of the software. – provide proof of the authenticity that the code has not been altered in any way – in some programming languages, it can also be used to help prevent namespace conflicts. Almost every code signing implementation will provide some sort of digital signature mechanism to verify the identity of the author or build system, and a checksum to verify that the object has not been modified. It can also be used to provide versioning information about an object or to store other meta data about an object. There are multiple ways to sign code. Microsoft has put together all available methods in this…


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