security

How to browse the web really anonymously

I’ve seen a lot of articles on the web about how to browse the web while keeping your privacy. By that I mean, nobody knows who you are, what you are browsing, no history kept, no temporary files remaining on the machine. Most of the articles on the web are created to make advertising to some VPN products. What is the solution? I think that the only solution is to use Tor, more specifically, the Tor Browser. The Tor software protects you by bouncing your communications around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around the world: it prevents somebody…


Lack of security made simple: Casual Insecurity

I am travelling quite a lot because of my job, working with Avira’s customers to integrate their OEM Technologies. For this reason, I am very often in hotels and airports. Almost everywhere these days, I can find free WiFis: wireless networks with free of charge access. We all know that accessing resources through free WiFis is not the best ideas. Especially, if these networks do not have any kind of password set.   This is how I think that the Lack of Security is made so simple: offer something everybody needs for free and make that as unsecure as possible….


Google Search Console fail over notifications for the WordPress updates

I have quite a lot of WordPress based websites which I run and maintain. One of these is this blog: www.SorinMustaca.com All my WordPress websites are configured to autoupdate to the latest WordPress update. The same applies to their plugins and themes. Google Search Console (GSC) is a tool I used to manage better the registration of my websites with the search engine and their advertising platform Adsense. Yesterday evening I received a couple of emails, one for each of my websites registered with the GSC : Here is the text: Recommended WordPress update available for http://sorinmustaca.com/ To: Webmaster of…



Not yet worried about vehicle hacking? You should be!

  As a matter of fact, it is not only vehicles that can be hacked, actually any IoT device can be hacked. AV-Test.org published this paper about vulnerabilities in the fitness wristbands and Apple Watch, which shows how they tested and how secure the devices are. However, a hack of these IoT devices is not as dangerous as hacking a vehicle. I am not saying that they don’t matter, on the contrary. This is why I am mostly interested in vehicles: hacking can be dangerous and it is, with manufacturer’s permission at least, to improve their security.   According to the RSA…


BMW and cybersecurity

Not a month passes without seeing some major car manufacturer that has cybersecurity issues. This month we have seen made public a report from February 2016 related to BMW. The short story   The BMW ConnectedDrive Web portal was found to contain a vulnerability that could result in a compromise of registered or valid vehicle identification numbers, Vulnerability Lab warns. The security bug, affecting the BMW ConnectedDrive online service web-application, is a VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) session vulnerability, security researcher Benjamin Kunz Mejri reveals. VIN, also known as chassis number, is a unique code used in the automotive industry to…


Do you actually need a security product in your car? Part 3 : Intrusion Prevention and Detection Systems

I ended part 2 with the promise that we will discuss about : 2) Intrusion detection and prevention systems (IDS/IPS or IDPS) From Wikipedia: Intrusion prevention systems (IPS), also known as intrusion detection and prevention systems (IDPS), are network security appliances that monitor network and/or system activities for malicious activity. The main functions of intrusion prevention systems are to identify malicious activity, log information about this activity, attempt to block/stop it, and report it. Intrusion prevention systems are considered extensions of intrusion detection systems because they both monitor network traffic and/or system activities for malicious activity. The main differences are,…


Do you actually need a security product in your car? Part 2: the classical antivirus

I wrote in the first part of this article about Detection, Protection, Remediation and I stopped at the part where we analyze what kind of security products do you need in the car of tomorrow. 1)The classical antivirus We know it to be used mostly for files. But it can much more than that. a) Files There are many files that can enter the car and can produce damages: music video updates (binary or data) scripts configuration files for various subsystems html and javascript (plain text) for rendering Java compiled files (especially if you run Android) possibly Adobe Flash (not sure though) possible…


Quoted on SecurityWeek.com over the 32,8 M Twitter accounts leaked

Source: http://www.securityweek.com/32-million-twitter-credentials-emerge-dark-web Author: Ionut Arghire, Security Week   The cybercriminal behind the claimed Twitter leak is the same hacker who was previously attempting to sell stolen data from Myspace, Tumblr and VK user accounts, namely Tessa88@exploit.im. The Twitter credentials have already made it online on paid search engine for hacked data LeakedSource, which says it received a total of 32,888,300 records, each containing user’s email address, username, possibly a second email, and a password. [..] What is yet unclear is how old the supposedly leaked data is, since LeakedSource doesn’t provide specific details on that, although they do suggest that…


Do you actually need a security product in your car? Part 1: Prevention, Detection, Remediation

Note: This is going to be a somehow longer article which I will finish in a couple of related posts.   A security product is a program that Prevents that malware enters the system Detects if previously unknown malware is running on the system Remediates the actions of detected malware on the system Note that it is not mentioned *how* PDR gets implemented in practice. There are many ways to implement them and it is out of the scope of this article how this gets realized.   Back to our question: Do you actually need a security product in your car?…


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