hack

“Your Site Has Been Hacked” ransomware email campaign in the wild

I was actually not expecting this kind of ransomware… I am used by now with “You’re hacked”, “You’re infected”… and others alike , but this one with the website is actually really interesting. What I find very disturbing is the fact that there are 5 transactions. A few were for tests, I think, but there is at least one who paid. They do use the a correct website of mine. PS: Of course that my site hasn’t been hacked :))   Here are some of the headers: Return-Path: <hacker@autoservistoth.cz> Received: from autoservistoth.cz ([213.157.59.58]) by mx.google.com with ESMTP id ce7si16117485edb.534.2020.04.17.03.08.14 for <sorin@mustaca.com>; Fri, 17 Apr 2020 03:08:23 -0700 (PDT) Received-SPF: neutral (google.com: 213.157.59.58 is neither permitted nor denied by best guess record for domain of hacker@autoservistoth.cz) client-ip=213.157.59.58; Authentication-Results: mx.google.com; spf=neutral (google.com: 213.157.59.58 is neither permitted nor denied by best guess record for domain of hacker@autoservistoth.cz) smtp.mailfrom=hacker@autoservistoth.cz X-AntiVirus: Checked by Dr.Web [version: 11.1.11.04270, engine: 11.1.9.04170, virus records: 6152810, updated: 8.05.2017] Return-path: <postmaster@thehomebase.top> From: “Hacker” <hacker@autoservistoth.cz> To: sorin@mustaca.com   For indexing better, this is the body of the email. PLEASE FORWARD THIS EMAIL TO SOMEONE IN YOUR COMPANY WHO IS ALLOWED TO MAKE IMPORTANT DECISIONS! We have hacked your website http://www.xxxxxx.com and extracted…


“Ha‌sta‌xla‌lyvi‌sta‌” says a “ha‌cke‌r” who tries to blackmail me using an obfuscated mail

We’ve seen millions of emails with blackmailing texts containing some username/email address and a password harvested from some hacked website. This one would be just another one, except that the text is obfuscated 🙂 It looks interesting but it is tiresome to try to read it. And why the effort, in the end ? Below is the email. This son of a b** who sent the email took good care to not obfuscate the BTC wallet. Unfortunately, somebody actually paid on 27.2.2020, but I am not sure if this is a victim or not. Here is the relevant part of the header of the email: Received: from asobkjzvu.com ([197.159.64.4]) by mx.google.com with SMTP id d3si5673968oia.236.2020.03.02.07.13.09 for <sorin@mustaca.com>; Mon, 02 Mar 2020 07:13:21 -0800 (PST) Received-SPF: neutral (google.com: 197.159.64.4 is neither permitted nor denied by best guess record for domain of sitjpemaj@asobkjzvu.com) client-ip=197.159.64.4; Authentication-Results: mx.google.com; spf=neutral (google.com: 197.159.64.4 is neither permitted nor denied by best guess record for domain of sitjpemaj@asobkjzvu.com) smtp.mailfrom=sitjpemaj@asobkjzvu.com X-K: live Received: from unknown (15.218.224.6) by qrx.quickslick.com with NNFMP; Mon, 02 Mar 2020 10:11:17 -0500 Received: from unknown (HELO smtp18.yenddx.com) (Mon, 02 Mar 2020 09:53:27 -0500) by relay.2yahoo.com with NNFMP; Mon, 02 Mar 2020 09:53:27 -0500 Received: from…


Interview in sputniknews.com: Experte zu Handy-Hacks: So kann man sich schützen

Experte zu Handy-Hacks: So kann man sich schützen TECHNIK 14:04 04.02.2020Zum Kurzlink Von Bolle Selke Die USA hacken das Handy von Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel und Saudi-Arabien das von Amazon-Chef Jeff Bezos? Müssen sich also nur Prominente Sorgen um ihr Smartphone machen? Nein, sagt der IT-Experte Sorin Mustaca im Interview und erklärt, wie man sich schützen kann. Read here the original: https://de.sputniknews.com/technik/20200204326418590-handy-hacks-schutz/ Die USA hacken das Handy von Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel und Saudi-Arabien das von Amazon-Chef Jeff Bezos? Müssen sich also nur Prominente Sorgen um ihr Smartphone machen? Nein, sagt der IT-Experte Sorin Mustaca im Interview und erklärt, wie man sich schützen kann. – Herr Mustaca, dass sich Leute wie Jeff Bezos oder Angela Merkel Sorgen um die Sicherheit ihrer Handykommunikation machen müssen ist logisch, aber muss man sich auch als Privatperson darüber Gedanken machen? – „Ich denke schon. Das Geld oder die Vorteile, die man von einer Privatperson bekommt, sind genauso gut, wie die von anderen Quellen. Man darf nicht vergessen, dass jeder von uns ein duales Leben hat: als Privatperson und als Geschäftsperson – egal ob als Angestellter oder Selbstständiger. Ein Lebensteil beeinflusst den anderen, das ist immer so. Die Informationen, die jemand über unser Privatleben hat, beeinflussen daher auch das Geschäftsleben.“ – Immer wieder gibt…


Chinese Researchers Remotely Hack Tesla Model S (Update)

Security researchers from China-based tech company Tencent have identified a series of vulnerabilities that can be exploited to remotely hack an unmodified Tesla Model S while it’s parked or on the move. The researchers managed to perform various actions. While the vehicle was parked, the experts demonstrated that they could: control the sunroof, the turn signals, the position of the seats, all the displays, the door locking system. While the car was on the move, the white hat hackers showed that they could activate the windshield wipers, fold the side view mirrors, and open the trunk. They also demonstrated that a remote hacker can activate the brakes from a long distance (e.g. 12 miles, as shown in the experiment). WOW… this can be deadly!   But wait, after “several months of in-depth research” ? This means that they spent several months to search for vulnerabilities to exploit ? This is what I mean by being insistent. The most interesting part is the UPDATE. Tesla told SecurityWeek that it addressed the vulnerabilities found by Keen Lab within 10 days after learning of their existence. The company pointed out that the attacks are not “fully” remote and they are not as easy…


Yahoo was hacked in 2014 and lost the credentials of over 500Mil accounts

Oh boy…. they were hacked two years ago and they say it was a “state sponsored attack”. What the hack is that ?! How do you differentiate a hack done by an employee from a state sponsored attack? Let’s take it step by step: Yahoo has started to write to all affected customers this email: https://s.yimg.com/sf/support/en-us-security-notice-content.pdf Below is the text of the email notice sent by Yahoo to potentially affected users. Please note that the email from Yahoo about this issue does not ask you to click on any links or contain attachments and does not request your personal information. If an email you receive about this issue prompts you to click on a link, download an attachment, or asks you for information, the email was not sent by Yahoo and may be an attempt to steal your personal information. Avoid clicking on links or downloading attachments from such suspicious emails. Nice… considering that many fraudsters will make use of it.       This is what you get when you login: First link is: https://help.yahoo.com/kb/account/SLN27925.html Here are all details of the breach, or whatever this was. Now the real stuff, observe the bold sentences: Account Security Issue FAQs We have confirmed, based…


Dropbox was breached in 2012, the data is now online – a quote in SecurityWeek

68 Million Exposed in Old Dropbox Hack By Ionut Arghire on August 31, 2016 In an email response to a SecurityWeek inquiry, IT security expert Sorin Mustaca said that the surprising fact is that the 2012 hack of Dropbox didn’t emerge earlier, along with the other mega-breaches. He also notes that the use of the SHA1 hashing algorithm with salting improves the security of these passwords. “Fortunately, Dropbox was using the SHA 1 hashing algorithm (today this is not considered “strong” anymore) and it was using salting even in 2012 – an operation that many other services don’t do even today. Many are using legacy systems which make use of MD5 without hashing – I guess that the ‘never change a running system’ is still applied literally in many websites,” Mustaca said. To stay protected, he says, users should create unique passwords for each of the services they use, never reuse passwords, and enable two-factor authentication wherever it is available. Service providers should never store passwords in plain text or encrypted, but should use a strong hashing function with a solid salt.   For consumers: –        Create a unique password for each service you use. Read my free eBook in…


Car hacking again… now at high speed!

Not even a week has passed since I was writing about “Not yet worried about vehicle hacking? You should be!” and we see in the news that at Blackhat that exactly this is happening. At BlackHat USA this week, the security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek are scheduled to present their latest findings in the world of car hacking. Again ! Miller and Valasek have already made names for themselves last year with the dramatic hacking of Jeep Cherokee, a interfering with its entertainment system, engine and brakes, while it was being driven down a busy highway at 70mph. Fiat Chrysler announced back then a safety recall of 1.4 million vehicles. Now, the situation changed. “By sending carefully crafted messages on the vehicle’s internal network known as a CAN bus, they’re now able to pull off even more dangerous, unprecedented tricks like causing unintended acceleration and slamming on the car’s brakes or turning the vehicle’s steering wheel at any speed.”(Wired) Watch for yourself the movies on YouTube:   What does this mean? Thankfully, their previous work helped Chrysler create a security update to fix the flaw that gave them their earlier, remote access to the Jeep’s guts. This new hack, however, is…


Quoted on SecurityWeek.com over the 32,8 M Twitter accounts leaked

Source: http://www.securityweek.com/32-million-twitter-credentials-emerge-dark-web Author: Ionut Arghire, Security Week   The cybercriminal behind the claimed Twitter leak is the same hacker who was previously attempting to sell stolen data from Myspace, Tumblr and VK user accounts, namely Tessa88@exploit.im. The Twitter credentials have already made it online on paid search engine for hacked data LeakedSource, which says it received a total of 32,888,300 records, each containing user’s email address, username, possibly a second email, and a password. [..] What is yet unclear is how old the supposedly leaked data is, since LeakedSource doesn’t provide specific details on that, although they do suggest that some credentials might be only a couple of years old. Furthermore, IT Security expertSorin Mustaca tells SecurityWeek that the manner in which these credentials were stolen isn’t that clear either. “Interesting enough, Leakedsource writes that they “very strong evidence that Twitter was not hacked”, rather the users got infected with some malware which stole credentials directly from the browsers of any account, not only Twitter’s,” Mustaca says. “However, there is no clear evidence presented that this is indeed the case. Their explanation for malware stealing credentials from browser is not entirely valid.” Although malware that targets browsers to steal user…


LinkedIn Legal : “Important information about your LinkedIn account”

Yeah, they’ve been hacked 4 years ago and now their data is everywhere … well, almost everywhere. The LinkedIn hack of 2012 is  now being sold on the dark web. It was allegedly 167 million accounts and for a mere 5 bitcoins (about US$2.2k) you could jump over to the Tor-based trading site, pay your Bitcoins and retrieve what is one of the largest data breaches ever to hit the airwaves. Until this week, when Myspace.com leak from 2013 (or 2008!) released data of over 360Mil users.   LinkedIn’s Legal wrote :   Notice of Data Breach You may have heard reports recently about a security issue involving LinkedIn. We would like to make sure you have the facts about what happened, what information was involved, and the steps we are taking to help protect you. What Happened? On May 17, 2016, we became aware that data stolen from LinkedIn in 2012 was being made available online. This was not a new security breach or hack. We took immediate steps to invalidate the passwords of all LinkedIn accounts that we believed might be at risk. These were accounts created prior to the 2012 breach that had not reset their passwords since…


I was right about the Myspace.com data: it is indeed old

You may have heard reports recently about a security incident involving Myspace. We would like to make sure you have the facts about what happened, what information was involved and the steps we are taking to protect your information. WHAT HAPPENED? Shortly before the Memorial Day weekend, we became aware that stolen Myspace user login data was being made available in an online hacker forum. The data stolen included user login data from a portion of accounts that were created prior to June 11, 2013 on the old Myspace platform. Source: https://myspace.com/pages/blog   But there is more: WHAT INFORMATION WAS INVOLVED? Email addresses, Myspace usernames, and Myspace passwords for the affected Myspace accounts created prior to June 11, 2013 on the old Myspace platform are at risk. As you know, Myspace does not collect, use or store any credit card information or user financial information of any kind. No user financial information was therefore involved in this incident; the only information exposed was users’ email address and Myspace username and password.   Troy Hunt writes also his own analysis and not surprisingly, he thinks that the data is actually around 8 years old . Additionally, he thinks that an insider…


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