automotive

Cybersecurity Engineering in the Automotive industry

A lot is happening in the Automotive industry these days. It has to do with connectivity, autonomous driving, autonomous parking, and so on. All these have one thing in common: they are producing extremely large amounts of data which needs to be processed in the backend by very powerful computers. When we talk connectivity, we MUST talk about cybersecurity.   This is why the Automotive industry has started to take this very seriously: We have the  ISO/SAE AWI 21434 : Road Vehicles — Cybersecurity engineering which is in the preparation stage We have the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) who have released the “Principles of…


Chinese Researchers Remotely Hack Tesla Model S (Update)

Security researchers from China-based tech company Tencent have identified a series of vulnerabilities that can be exploited to remotely hack an unmodified Tesla Model S while it’s parked or on the move. The researchers managed to perform various actions. While the vehicle was parked, the experts demonstrated that they could: control the sunroof, the turn signals, the position of the seats, all the displays, the door locking system. While the car was on the move, the white hat hackers showed that they could activate the windshield wipers, fold the side view mirrors, and open the trunk. They also demonstrated that…


Car hacking again… now at high speed!

Not even a week has passed since I was writing about “Not yet worried about vehicle hacking? You should be!” and we see in the news that at Blackhat that exactly this is happening. At BlackHat USA this week, the security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek are scheduled to present their latest findings in the world of car hacking. Again ! Miller and Valasek have already made names for themselves last year with the dramatic hacking of Jeep Cherokee, a interfering with its entertainment system, engine and brakes, while it was being driven down a busy highway at 70mph. Fiat Chrysler announced…


Let the competition for “securing the car” begin!

I didn’t actually want to write such a post, but several press releases drew my attention. So, the competition to protect the car has begun. Big players are now on the hunt for customers. But, when you talk to customers like Daimler, VW, BMW, Nissan and others, the discussions  will take a while. I will maintain the list below with technologies I see in categories. Please note that I write here only vendors that actually have a technology that mitigates threats in the cars and not just any vendor that talks generic about IoT or embedded solutions. I also exclude solutions which address…


Do you actually need a security product in your car? Part 1: Prevention, Detection, Remediation

Note: This is going to be a somehow longer article which I will finish in a couple of related posts.   A security product is a program that Prevents that malware enters the system Detects if previously unknown malware is running on the system Remediates the actions of detected malware on the system Note that it is not mentioned *how* PDR gets implemented in practice. There are many ways to implement them and it is out of the scope of this article how this gets realized.   Back to our question: Do you actually need a security product in your car?…


Responsibility for Vehicle Security and Driver Privacy in the Age of the Connected Car

Source: Responsibility for Vehicle Security and Driver Privacy in the Age of the Connected Car Sponsored by: Veracode, Created by IDC Author: Duncan Brown   IDC conducted in-depth interviews with leading vehicle manufacturers and automotive industry representatives, as well as 1072 drivers across the UK and Germany. These are the questions that the survey had:   What are the cybersecurity implications of the connected car? Around 30% in both countries are somewhat concerned” that such aids could be hacked and fail to operate as intended. If you then also include those who were “very concerned” and “extremely concerned” the total increases to…


Nissan’s connected car app offline after trivial to exploit vulnerability revealed

On Wednesday Nissan disabled an app that allowed owners of its electric Leaf car to control their cars’ heating and cooling from their phones, after the Australian researcher Troy Hunt showed he could use it to control others’ cars as well. The NissanConnect EV app, formerly called CarWings, enabled a remote hacker to access the Leaf’s temperature controls and review its driving record, merely by knowing the car’s VIN (vehicle identification number). The app will turn the climate control on or off—it decided not to bother requiring any kind of authentication. When a Leaf owner connects to their car via a smartphone, the only information that…


More insecure software around car (in)security

As I mentioned already, anything that runs software has to abide to secure coding principles. Cars run more software than many other devices around us. And they run special software… which needs to be taken care of by other special software. And when that software is vulnerable, then you’re in trouble! Now some researchers discovered that by exploiting a zero-day exploit found in car mechanics software used to debug and fix cars sold by the Volkswagen Group. This software is built and sold by third-parties, not Volkswagen. This is not new, I already wrote an article about this: As expected: the USB…


As expected: the USB Stick-like infection from PCs goes to automotive as well!

Just seen this article on Wired Magazine: Car Hack Technique Uses Dealerships to Spread Malware At the Derbycon hacker conference in Louisville, Kentucky last week, security consultant Craig Smith presented a tool designed to find security vulnerabilities in equipment that’s used by mechanics and dealerships to update car software and run vehicle diagnostics, and sold by companies like Snap-On and Bosch. Smith’s invention, built with around $20 of hardware and free software that he’s released on GitHub, is designed to seek out—and hopefully help fix—bugs in those dealership tools that could transform them into a devious method of hacking thousands of…


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